Comments on: People are passionate, anxious about eliminating grades in school http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2011/08/people-are-passionate-anxious-about-eliminating-grades-in-school.html Education on the Edge Fri, 22 Nov 2019 06:29:50 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.12 By: Tracy Watanabe http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2011/08/people-are-passionate-anxious-about-eliminating-grades-in-school.html#comment-189 Sun, 14 Aug 2011 16:35:54 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2011/08/people-are-passionate-anxious-about-eliminating-grades-in-school.html#comment-189 Hi Mark,

I’m glad you said it can be taught. That’s the response I give when I’m asked that question. I just have to remind people that it’s a learning process for the teacher. It doesn’t all happen at once, but steps over time.

Kind regards,
Tracy Watanabe

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By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2011/08/people-are-passionate-anxious-about-eliminating-grades-in-school.html#comment-188 Thu, 11 Aug 2011 13:38:11 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2011/08/people-are-passionate-anxious-about-eliminating-grades-in-school.html#comment-188 Tracy, thanks for your insights on this. You sound like a ROLE teacher already. Maybe you’ll consider committing to the Results Only Project linked above.

I think the ROLE is for all grade levels. You are right, to a degree, about teachers needing to understand how to tap into intrinsic motivation. I think it’s fairly easy to learn, though.

Thanks for weighing in on this.

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By: Tracy Watanabe http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2011/08/people-are-passionate-anxious-about-eliminating-grades-in-school.html#comment-187 Thu, 11 Aug 2011 03:54:11 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2011/08/people-are-passionate-anxious-about-eliminating-grades-in-school.html#comment-187 Hi Mark,

When someone highly regarded says they are eliminating grades, people respond. For those who are against the idea, I would bet they spend much of their time grading, so that very idea would cause a response.

For those who spend much of their time focused on authentic learning, they are probably used to various assessments and have seen the results from self assessment.

Where do I stand? I like having multiple assessments, but don’t pay too much stock in the summative. If you teach them how to think, then bubbling in an answer is easy-peasy-lemon-squeezey.

In order to pull off the type of classroom where students give themselves their own grades, then there is a huge amount of weight on that teacher as facilitator, knowing how to cater to students’ strengths, engage them, tap into authentic learning… I think that is something we all could and should do; but sometimes wonder if everyone has that gift.

Do you think it’s something that can be taught? Or is it just something that magical teachers intuitively “get?”

My other question I ponder is if this is just a discussion for the older grades, or are we talking our primary kids too?

I love the discussion. Thanks for causing us to think!

Kind regards,
Tracy Watanabe

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