Most popular posts of 2013: are they brilliant or insane?

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It’s been an exciting and wild year in writing for me. ASCD published two of my books, Role Reversal and The 5-Minute Teacher. I wrote articles for Teacher Librarian, Learning and Leading with Technology, SmartBlog on Education and eSchool News, to name a few.

Because of my love of blogging and the popularity of my work, thanks to you, I decided to post daily content here at the newly-named Brilliant or Insane Blog.


Here are the most popular posts of 2013

  1. KidBlog is no longer completely free — When I realized that the popular education blog host moved to a paid upgrade platform, I wasn’t happy. This post prompted a social media uproar and a mix of upset users and KidBlog defenders.
  2. Dear Parents: I want to stop grading your children — With a promise to redouble my efforts to end traditional grading, I started by giving teachers a letter that explains the reasons for ending grades.
  3. Top 5 reasons homework fails children — This post originated earlier at ASCDEDge but was hugely popular here, when I posted it this year. Homework is always a hot-button issue among educators.
  4. Top 5 reasons to eliminate guided reading — What can I say, teachers are passionate about what they teach and Top 5 posts typically generate a lot of views. This one was no different.
  5. Hey Major League Baseball, I’m breaking up with you — I began my journalism career as a sports writer, so I enjoy the occasional post about sports. I’m not completely sure why, but this one got plenty of run here at Brilliant or Insane? 
  6. KidBlog CEO defends move to pay platform — After many shares of my original post revealing KidBlog’s move to a freemium model, co-founder and CEO Matt Hardy commented, sparking even more dialogue from the blog’s users.
  7. We must teach our kids about Nelson Mandela — The death of the former South Africa president inspired this post. Hopefully, it will encourage teachers to keep Mandela’s memory alive.
So, what do you think? Are any of these blog posts brilliant? Are any insane? 
Please comment. There’s much more to come in 2014.
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Mark Barnes is the author of many education books, including Bestseller Hacking Education, part of his Hack Learning Series, books that solve big problems with simple ideas. Barnes presents internationally on assessment, connected education, and student-centered learning. Join more than 100,000 interested educators who follow @markbarnes19 on Twitter.
  1. Michele
    • Mark Barnes

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