5 Things I Think About Twitter After 25,000 Tweets

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via Twitter.com

It’s fair to say I’m a bit obsessed with Twitter. I send dozens of tweets daily, participate in and moderate twitter chats, have multiple Twitter accounts, and I even teach a 3 semester hour course on using Twitter as a professional development tool.

Soon, I’ll surpass 25,000 tweets. This got me thinking about Twitter. Here are 5 things I thought:

  1. I Tweet a lot: The average number of tweets sent by a user on Twitter is 307 according to DMR. Considering more than 100 million people are active Twitter users each month, I was astonished by this statistic. It makes my 25K really cool, or it means I have far too much time on my hands.
  2. 6,000 people make for a lot of friends: For a couple of years now, I’ve been actively attempting to build my Twitter following. At roughly 6,000 followers, I used to feel sort of lonely. After all, I know educators who have more than 100,000, which is staggering, I think, for someone who is not a celebrity. Then, when I reviewed the stats on DMR, I realized that the average Twitter user has a paltry 208 followers. Suddenly, it seems like I’m standing in a very large crowd. Thanks PLN.
  3. It’s okay to seek out new friends: For a long time, my connection philosophy was: “If you tweet it, they will come.” I shared lots of content and waited for followers. Sure, I gained a couple of thousand loyal friends, but then my connections stagnated. I realized not so long ago that seeking out interesting people and following them first is sort of like handing out a business card. You’ll be surprised how many people follow back. This reciprocation is what puts the “social” in social media.
  4. Cyber friends can be real friends: When I started using Twitter, it was nothing more than a promotional tool, and the people there were nothing more mythical figures, locked in my computer monitor. Now, I have made numerous friends from Twitter, whom I have met at conferences, dined with and collaborated with on various projects. This is the best part of Twitter.
  5. Mixed in those 25,000 tweets is some compelling conversation: While there are plenty of times I tweet a link to something and there is little follow-up, sometimes a simple statement or link sparks a very interesting debate, like this one.
How often do you tweet, and what do you think about Twitter?
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Mark Barnes is the author of many education books, including Bestseller Hacking Education, part of his Hack Learning Series, books that solve big problems with simple ideas. Barnes presents internationally on assessment, connected education, and student-centered learning. Join more than 100,000 interested educators who follow @markbarnes19 on Twitter.

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