Comments on: The Case for The Case Against Zeros http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html Education on the Edge Thu, 14 Nov 2019 06:13:35 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.12 By: Sam Koncord http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-9207 Sat, 26 Oct 2019 16:36:59 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-9207 all yalls beuuin n tou wite fou me

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By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-5351 Tue, 03 May 2016 17:43:55 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-5351 I taught teenagers for 23 years. I’m acutely aware of what they do and don’t understand and what they do and don’t value. I know they hate being bored, as do adults. I know that a worksheet littered with the same ridiculous math problem is not engaging or valuable. Teachers who take the time to improve their practice and investigate activities and tools that make learning fun can always find ways to engage learners. I have lots of resources I can recommend — many of which are housed here at B or I. Thanks for weighing in.
Mark Barnes recently posted…5 Ways to Get 100 Percent Participation in Every ClassMy Profile

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By: David H Holmquist http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-5350 Tue, 03 May 2016 16:53:52 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-5350 “Why does it have so little value that students are not interested in completing it?” What makes you think that teenagers are capable of understanding the value of an assignment? Do you even understand teenagers?

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By: David H Holmquist http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-5349 Tue, 03 May 2016 16:49:24 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-5349 Are you kidding me? The reason a student doesn’t do the assignment is because the assignment is poorly designed? What do you consider to be an assignment that is so intrinsically interesting and engaging that every student will do it?

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By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-2942 Mon, 16 Feb 2015 22:55:20 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-2942 Right, Karin. Plus, I must wonder if students blow off 8 assignments, what’s wrong with those assignments? Thanks for your insight. I hope you’ll be a regular here at B or I.
Mark Barnes recently posted…7 Reasons Teachers Should Stop Grading Their Students ForeverMy Profile

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By: Karin Mason http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-2939 Mon, 16 Feb 2015 14:43:12 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-2939 Erik,
A student cannot blow off 80% of your work and still pass. Let’s say you give 10 assignments and each is worth 100 points. The student only completes 2 with quality, earning 200 points. For the remaining 8 assignments, the student receives the 50 point base credit. This student will receive a 60% grade overall, which is still a failure. A failure is a failure is a failure, whether it is a 20% or a 58%. The biggest benefit that I have found with this type of grading model is that low performing students are more motivated to try and not give up hope when they have a 50 point deficit to make up as opposed to an 80 or 100 point deficit.

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By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-2272 Thu, 17 Jul 2014 15:52:14 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-2272 Erik, while I understand your argument, my response is that I wold eliminate the grades entirely, so the “fifties” argument is irrelevant. If a student “blows off” your work, I’d say there is a problem with the activity. Why does it have so little value that students are not interested in completing it? I have a case against zeroes, 100-point assignments, extra credit and anything that measures learning. Thanks for weighing in on this.
Mark Barnes recently posted…7 Reasons Teachers Should Stop Grading Their Students ForeverMy Profile

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By: Erik http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-2271 Thu, 17 Jul 2014 15:26:21 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2014/04/the-case-for-the-case-against-zeros.html#comment-2271 The Dangers of Douglas B. Reeves’s Argument

While I agree with some of Mr. Reeves’s hypotheses, I am worried for others, specifically the notion that changing zeros on a one hundred point scale to fifties would be more equitable. I’m surprised he didn’t make it fifty points and a cupcake.

For someone railing against mathematical hypocrisy he is treading very thin ice by suggesting this. To be clear, he is advocating a system where a student can complete two out of every ten assignments and pass a class. This is a solution? I cannot, in good conscience, send the message that students can blow off 80% of my work, do well on 20%, and expect to be successful. Sorry. Not going to happen.

Ultimately he concedes the idea of using a hundred point scale altogether in favor of a four point one, which I am much more open to discussing even though it is not without its own inherent problems. However, my fear is that most teachers reading, “The Case Against the Zero” would opt to disrupt their current system as little as possible and just change zeros to fifties. Again, this is to say to students that if they only show up on Fridays and work really hard, they’ll pass our classes.

Doug is right, there is no trick here; except perhaps how a student graduating from a school that requires only 20% of its work to be done is going to fare well in life; that’s a trick I’d really like to see.

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