Comments on: 6 Ways Teachers Kill the Joy of Learning http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/6-ways-teachers-kill-the-joy-of-learning.html Education on the Edge Fri, 13 Sep 2019 03:49:34 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.11 By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/6-ways-teachers-kill-the-joy-of-learning.html#comment-5450 Sun, 19 Jun 2016 21:57:25 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4332#comment-5450 An engaged, chaotic classroom takes work to create. When done right, there’s nothing better for any age. I wonder if you’ve ever seen a Kindergarten class. Most are chaotic, creative, engaging places. When we introduce control, learning stops.
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By: Jennie Kiessling http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/6-ways-teachers-kill-the-joy-of-learning.html#comment-5449 Sun, 19 Jun 2016 21:01:57 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4332#comment-5449 An engaged classroom is all well and good…. Learning from a little chaos? At an early age?…. Appropriate boundaries need to be provided. Chaos is often what many students are trying to get away from in their home lives- whether as children or adult learners and anywhere in between. This is not the 1960’s. The world is a much different place. When the students you have taught arrive to my community college classroom without the basics of understanding what it is to research, to think critically, how to communicate effectively, listen effectively and graciously in the group learning environment; how to write a sentence, and how not to use their phones to for personal texts during class, their earlier education years have not been ineffective.

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By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/6-ways-teachers-kill-the-joy-of-learning.html#comment-5386 Tue, 24 May 2016 13:42:56 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4332#comment-5386 One thing I forgot to add. Formative assessment should never be graded. Not that I favor grades at any point of learning, but formative assessment is about diagnosing problems. During the formative assessment process, mistakes should be embraced and used to inform future lessons. Hope this helps.
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By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/6-ways-teachers-kill-the-joy-of-learning.html#comment-5384 Tue, 24 May 2016 13:38:46 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4332#comment-5384 Derek, I sense lots of frustration on your part, and it’s understandable. Schools that mandate how teachers teach and demand weekly grades and homework have leaders that destroy teaching and learning. If you can’t influence change there, I’d recommend creating an exit strategy because you’re in a place that does not have kids’ best interests at heart. Or, if it does, the leades are misguided in their approach. As far as throwing out grades and rules and consequences, this is a systemic change that takes a full year of patience and perseverance. Several years, I had classes filled with students like those you describe. I stuck with the program, though. I talked to them daily about being part of a vibrant learning community. I pulled kids aside every single day, explaining how I needed them to contribute. Most important, I worked tirelessly to create lessons with short segments and lots of transition. I’ve had the most challenging students you can have, and trust me, if you keep things moving (never do one thing for more than 5 minutes), and make it fun, kids will engage. Meanwhile, let me recommend a book: 5 Principles of the Modern Mathematics Classroom, by Gerald Aungst (disclaimer: I wrote the foreword). This is a marvelous starting ground for finding innovative ways to teach math. http://www.amazon.com/Principles-Modern-Mathematics-Classroom-Innovative/dp/1483391426/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1464096930&sr=1-1&keywords=gerald+aungst. Good luck and stay in touch.
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By: Derek http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/6-ways-teachers-kill-the-joy-of-learning.html#comment-5383 Tue, 24 May 2016 00:07:51 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4332#comment-5383 I read articles like this and I wonder what classroom these people are working in. I am a few days away from my first year as a teacher and it has been hell. I taught high school math – five different subjects a day. I was the only math teacher; my mentor was the science teacher, a lot easier to do hands on stuff… and a VERY different philosophy of education.

I have policies set by the school board about how many grades I have to have, policies by the state about the topics I have to cover.

No direct instruction? Everything I teach is extremely hypothetical and abstract. Sometimes I can find real world uses but often the real world requires things much simpler than I’m teaching… or much more complex. That’s why word problems in books tend to be so contrived. In fact, I started out trying to do a flipped classroom model… but my students refused to read at home, some didn’t have net access so Khan Academy was out (and the school actually blocked YouTube). The only way to actually get information to my students was to tell it to them in class.

Worksheets and homework? The school mandated a certain grade split. Mathematically, if I gave my students perfect scores on all formative assessments, they’d only need a 25% on the summative ones to pass the course. 25% doesn’t show knowledge mastery. Heck, I started out the year flabbergasted at how little my students knew from previous classes.

No rules and consequences? I have kids literally throwing things at each other, attacking each other, and vandalizing school property. There’s a difference between a chaotic classroom that allows learning and a chaotic classroom that distracts from learning.

More than one way to learn… I keep looking for this, and see strategies, and it seems all of them are written for other classes or lower grade levels. I have no idea how to apply any of them to the very abstract concepts found in high school math.

Keep kids connected? This was my biggest bane! I gave kids classroom time to work on assignments, while I’m there to help. Some kids used that time and help. Others? Well, the school gave all the students laptops, so they had Flash games, Netflix, or Tinder that were far more interesting than math.

And then there’s the SE2R method. My first thought? “I’m already killing myself trying to get on top of all this grading, and now I’m supposed to grade assignments repeatedly?” I have students who give up as soon as they get a 70, students who have been conditioned to expect passing grades from doing halfass jobs (especially when I express concern to the administrators and they ask me if I could drop a few zeroes to bring grades up so we don’t lose funding), and students who could get hundreds but it would be too much work.

These seem like excellent tips for dealing with students who come already motivated to learn, in districts where the teachers have more flexibility in number of assignments and grade weights. But many of them seem terrible to use with students who have already lost a love of learning… which is many high school students.

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By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/6-ways-teachers-kill-the-joy-of-learning.html#comment-2408 Fri, 19 Sep 2014 10:52:20 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4332#comment-2408 Creating a learning community build on mutual respect is best. Actually, a little chaos will engage learners.
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By: Elmourhir http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/6-ways-teachers-kill-the-joy-of-learning.html#comment-2407 Fri, 19 Sep 2014 10:16:17 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4332#comment-2407 I do agree with you that there are many learning joy killer practices inside our classrooms some of which are what you mentioned in this article. Still, setting rules to control some unwanted behaviours inside the classroom is really crucial at least for me, Because without these rules, one can live in a chaotic atmosphere which definitely hinders the teacher from achieving his/her objectives. A student who moves from his seat without permission or use his mobile phone to check his facebook profile or listen to music can never assimilate your message.

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