Comments on: Accelerated Reader: Brilliant or Insane? http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/accelerated-reader-brilliant-insane.html Education on the Edge Sun, 10 Mar 2019 13:54:46 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.10 By: Anastasios http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/accelerated-reader-brilliant-insane.html#comment-8838 Fri, 09 Mar 2018 02:24:30 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4525#comment-8838 You eventually will be asked to read AND comprehend something important in life.. if you don’t do it, or do a poor job, you’ll be fired. That’ll teach them all they need. But this whole “self esteem” nonsense is just that!
Now, when we did it, NOTHING was off limits as far as reading level goes. it was simply a waste of your time if you read the book, but couldn’t pa But i’ve started to realize that the lack of emphasais 🙂

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By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/accelerated-reader-brilliant-insane.html#comment-5014 Tue, 22 Sep 2015 15:31:09 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4525#comment-5014 I can empathize Leigh. It may be time to speak to a teacher and/or a principal. I spoke to my kids’ principal about my concerns with AR. She assured me that my children would be able to choose books–even ones outside their “reading levels.” I still dislike the program, but it has not, fortunately, hurt their love of reading. It seems to me that in your case, the teacher should find an alternative way to evaluate your son’s reading ability. Good luck, and please keep us posted.
Mark Barnes recently posted…Appreciating Terrific Teachers: 10 Things Parents Can Do to Show Their SupportMy Profile

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By: Leigh http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/accelerated-reader-brilliant-insane.html#comment-5013 Tue, 22 Sep 2015 13:16:16 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4525#comment-5013 I don’t know if my comment has to be approved. I don’t see it yet. I have an addition to make…

My son has not brought his AR book home this week. He is supposed to read 100 minutes a week, at home, only from his AR book. He has not brought it home, but decided to read a science book we already had. I told him, “I don’t think that book is on the AR list, you are not supposed to record the minutes from books not on the AR list.”

Do you know what he said? He said, “I don’t care. It is very interesting. I don’t care if it’s on the list.” That, my friends, is intrinsic desire to read. Which he will probably be punished for on his grade for his reading log… We are going to record the minutes anyway. I’ll argue with the teacher if necessary, but I don’t know how it will go.

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By: Leigh http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/accelerated-reader-brilliant-insane.html#comment-5012 Tue, 22 Sep 2015 13:03:06 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4525#comment-5012 My son is doing AR for the first time this year. He is in 4th grade. As an avid reader myself I am extremely frustrated by this program. I love to read fiction, and I probably would have excelled at AR if I had participated in it when I was in school. I have had an intrinsic love of reading from a very early age. I don’t think AR would have increased my love of reading, but I would have racked up the points. I don’t think it is working well with my son. He is on the Autism Spectrum, would have been called Asperger’s a few years ago, but just High Functioning Autism now. He loves to read NON-FICTION. Last year we fulfilled his reading requirements by reading lots of non-fiction, including books and magazines. He loves Ranger Rick, National Geographic, Wired etc… None of these count for AR reading. He also enjoys reading some of my college biology textbooks. I have to help him understand some concepts of course, but he devours this information. None of this counts as reading for AR either. His teacher told me that AR has increased the number of non-fiction books in their database, but of all the ones we have on our bookshelves (a lot) very few of them are in the database. Additionally, many of the non-fiction books seem to be worth far less points than similar level fiction books.

This whole thing is driving me crazy. I’ve tried to keep an open mind, and he is reading more fiction this year, so that is good that he is stretching his genres a bit. Still, I find it incredibly limiting. We are reading much less this year. We used to sit and read magazines and discuss the articles, but now he doesn’t want to do that because it’s not worth any points. Frankly, I just hate AR and I think it is damaging my son’s desire to read.

I don’t know how to make this work for him.

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By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/accelerated-reader-brilliant-insane.html#comment-2637 Thu, 13 Nov 2014 12:20:51 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4525#comment-2637 Ruth, I’m glad you make a weak tool work for you and your students. I, too, had many classes with 30 students. I didn’t need AR to track reading. There are many ways to have the students take ownership in the books they read. Far better ways, in fact, than using an AR list and quizzes. Even kids from poor homes will embrace reading, when it’s handled properly. I’m sure people can make AR more effective. The problem is that most teachers don’t do this. It saddens me that schools embrace a tool that levels books and provides poorly-constructed quizzes as a means of tracking reading.
Mark Barnes recently posted…Why Traditional Grades Fail All Students: #TTOG ChatMy Profile

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By: Ruth Corrie http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/accelerated-reader-brilliant-insane.html#comment-2635 Thu, 13 Nov 2014 07:09:57 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4525#comment-2635 I have been using AR with my students for many years. I have never once told a child they are not allowed to read a book out of their ZPD range but have often discussed and guided choices, particularly with struggling readers. I can honestly say that the ability to track the amount students read has been transformational. Middle class children generally don’t need AR – they are born into families that can read, do read and own books. They learn to choose books.They get to discuss books. But what about our disadvantaged students? They need a lot more from schools.
AR doesn’t preclude choice and discussion – it just helps busy teachers with 5 or 6 classes of 30 students per day keep track.

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By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/accelerated-reader-brilliant-insane.html#comment-2633 Thu, 13 Nov 2014 00:53:56 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4525#comment-2633 Leyla, I’m glad you found a way to make a potentially dangerous tool work. I don’t understand your comment about tracking progress and celebrating success. I never used AR, yet I saw hundreds of students become voracious readers who could discuss all facets of fiction and nonfiction gracefully. Putting a test score on their amazing achievements would have undermined, not celebrated, our success.
Mark Barnes recently posted…Why Traditional Grades Fail All Students: #TTOG ChatMy Profile

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By: Leyla http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2014/09/accelerated-reader-brilliant-insane.html#comment-2632 Thu, 13 Nov 2014 00:34:07 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=4525#comment-2632 I worked with AR for all 14 years of my middle schol English teaching experience. For the first 5 years, I used it mostly incorrectly, limiting students to their ZPD only, trusting the assessment completely, and assigning students a point value to earn that was not always reasonable. Then I learned to use it correctly, and for the next 8 years, my charter school made more growth in reading comprehension according to the NWEA’s MAP test than almost any other school in our national charter network, of which there are more than 140 schools. AR is a tool, not The Way. It was a critical tool in our reading program, though, and we could not have tracked progress, celebrated success, or had knowledge about books without it. For me, AR is brilliant.

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