Comments on: The Dishonor of the With Honors System http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2015/01/promotion-with-honors.html Education on the Edge Thu, 23 May 2019 03:52:49 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.10 By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2015/01/promotion-with-honors.html#comment-3821 Tue, 07 Jul 2015 23:47:52 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2012/06/promotion-with-honors.html#comment-3821 Thanks for the insights David. We must absolutely get assessment right. Unfortunately, we tend to fall short in this area. Appreciate you weighing in here at Brilliant or Insane. Don’t be a stranger.
Mark Barnes recently posted…6 Ways to Turn Students into Lifelong ReadersMy Profile

]]>
By: David N. Andrews M. Ed., C. P. S. E. http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2015/01/promotion-with-honors.html#comment-3818 Tue, 07 Jul 2015 18:51:16 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2012/06/promotion-with-honors.html#comment-3818 Thank you!
Always interesting to read education blogs, especially when the opinions expressed are interesting. This article being an example. I can see why you posted it: it deals with a rather unjust aspect of education and something that is supposed to represent personal achievement in higher education but which has ended up being used – inadvertantly or otherwise – as a tool to shame those who did not achieve M or H level passes. There are many reasons outside of laziness why students might not achieve per their potential, and that is why any grading system should at least be sensitive to those situations. In the UK, a degree or diploma (without grade/classification) might be awarded to a student whose work up to the finals had been hitherto of great promise but who was ill at the time of examinations – the ‘aegrotat’ award.

Assessment is a very important thing to get right. It has to measure what it purports to measure. It has to be sensitive to unfavourable situations and correct for them. It has to be an accurate measure of what has been learned and understood. That’s a big ask. And all this based on a limited time-frame in which to do the study?! Even taller ask, really, isn’t it? I sometimes wonder if Skinner wasn’t far from correct in his idea of how learning should progress: little increments, reinforcement at each stage, relevant feedback to errant responses, and time to actually master to topic being taught.

]]>
By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2015/01/promotion-with-honors.html#comment-3803 Mon, 06 Jul 2015 12:00:19 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2012/06/promotion-with-honors.html#comment-3803 Thanks for reading and weighing in, David. Please don’t be a stranger here at B or I.
Mark Barnes recently posted…5 Reasons to Allow Texting in ClassMy Profile

]]>
By: David N. Andrews M. Ed., C. P. S. E. http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2015/01/promotion-with-honors.html#comment-3798 Sun, 05 Jul 2015 19:50:47 +0000 http://69.195.124.205/~brillil0/2012/06/promotion-with-honors.html#comment-3798 “I had the distinct pleasure of calling the roll, a simple task, as long as you don’t miss the designations of ‘M’ and ‘H’ at the end of many surnames.

A student with an ‘H’ is promoted ‘with honors’, meaning her GPA was 3.5 or higher. The ‘M’s’ are ‘with merit’.”

In the UK, graduands are called forward for their degrees in alphabetical order and with no mention of the class of honours they achieved. Surely there is no need to state, even on a call-on roster for the presentations, that someone achieved a merit pass or an honours pass. That is a matter between the graduands and their waiting degree certificates.

“While I was often considered for the job, I never called the names of graduates again.”

I don’t blame you.

]]>