Comments on: Hands Down: Fifteen Techniques that Ignite Total Participation http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2015/03/hands-fifteen-techniques-ignite-total-participation.html Education on the Edge Tue, 11 Dec 2018 02:42:51 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.9 By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2015/03/hands-fifteen-techniques-ignite-total-participation.html#comment-3053 Wed, 11 Mar 2015 15:43:48 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=6317#comment-3053 I do not, John. Thrively is pretty new. I have used it with my own children and find it to be amazingly helpful. By the end of this year, I think Thrively will be used in schools across the country.
Mark Barnes recently posted…4 Amazingly Easy Steps to Engage Learners: InfographicMy Profile

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By: John Bennett http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2015/03/hands-fifteen-techniques-ignite-total-participation.html#comment-3048 Mon, 09 Mar 2015 19:25:01 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=6317#comment-3048 Thanks, Mark. Do you have students that have used it? When I clicked on the link, I was asked for “my child’s name.”
John Bennett recently posted…UDL, Considerations, and Effective LearningMy Profile

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By: Mark Barnes http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2015/03/hands-fifteen-techniques-ignite-total-participation.html#comment-3047 Mon, 09 Mar 2015 17:46:13 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=6317#comment-3047 Hey John, a new player in the digital portfolio game is http://www.thrively.com. I think Thrively is exactly what we need to create a portfolio of work that can be easily shared and that creates a true picture of learning and of work. Let’s keep the discussion moving.
Mark Barnes recently posted…Awakening Your Inner Bruce Lee: Homework without HomeworkMy Profile

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By: John Bennett http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2015/03/hands-fifteen-techniques-ignite-total-participation.html#comment-3046 Mon, 09 Mar 2015 14:49:57 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=6317#comment-3046 Please know that I am aware there need to be course grades for a lot of reasons. BUT I also believe strongly in two points. First, there needs to be strong discussion and problem solving to see if an alternative to grades can be found; I think this would be a much better indication of learning than a transcript with course grades (typically the only thing you can get from your school or college after graduation – OK, letters asking for donations too – by the way). And, second, I am a strong believer in the student-prepared portfolio with teachers giving only feedback, no grades; the student then proposes a course grade – with teacher and student discussing the outcome face-to-face. So I still believe in course grades, ones I believe are more meaningful (after all, the student has the portfolio – electronic being best so that teacher also has one for each student as well. Those student e-portfolios are great input to teacher portfolios if we can ever get away from student standardized test scores to evaluate teachers.
John Bennett recently posted…UDL, Considerations, and Effective LearningMy Profile

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By: Angela Stockman http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2015/03/hands-fifteen-techniques-ignite-total-participation.html#comment-3041 Mon, 09 Mar 2015 02:31:17 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=6317#comment-3041 I do follow, yes! I’m a lurker for now. One of the things I struggle with is the notion that common standards aren’t necessary for reporting and that we can assign grades using our own unique criteria.

What worries me is that grades matter in many places, and they influence many high stakes decisions. Systems use them for placement purposes, for instance. Kids are granted or denied experiences that influence the trajectory of their lives based on grades. Sad but true, right? If the grades I assign inside my system mean something different than those assigned inside another and we aren’t using common standards, we become a big part of the problem. Kids suffer for this.

When we define common standards and measure progress against them in similar ways, equity increases. I really struggle to understand how to accomplish this when my definition of what quality means differs from everyone elses’, I guess. I suppose that if grades aren’t being used at all and portfolios can be submitted to represent what learners know and can do, this sort of concern is lessened. That’s the ideal. I sure wish my own kids were raised inside of systems like these.

Until then, though….I really think we need to strive for standards based reporting in order to serve kids best. What do you think?
Angela Stockman recently posted…Create an Installation of Learning Made Visible and Then Invite CompanyMy Profile

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By: John Bennett http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2015/03/hands-fifteen-techniques-ignite-total-participation.html#comment-3040 Mon, 09 Mar 2015 02:21:03 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=6317#comment-3040 I’m in agreement with not liking grades (have you checked out the Twitter #TTOG chat on Mondays at 7ET?). I’d use a student portfolio with their input on participation as an input to the – presumably always required – course grade. Do you follow the pieces written by Star Sackstein and Mark Barnes on no grades? The presumption i make is that participation options I listed would keep the discussion moving and would hopefully be less stressful (“good” participation grade doesn’t require “correct” answers – just participation, as presented by the student for review…
John Bennett recently posted…UDL, Considerations, and Effective LearningMy Profile

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By: Angela Stockman http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2015/03/hands-fifteen-techniques-ignite-total-participation.html#comment-3039 Mon, 09 Mar 2015 01:03:43 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=6317#comment-3039 Tell me more about this, John. Including classroom participation in course grades has been something I’ve always cautioned teachers against, actually.

Let me explain: I think it’s unfortunate that many systems still use grades to report on student progress, particularly since the standards and methods we use to calculate these grades often vary dramatically from one teacher to the next let alone one system to the next. In the end, grades are often very arbitrary things. They also shift the focus from learning to evaluation.

I’m a huge fan of standards based reporting. This empowers teachers to eliminate grades while developing a common language between themselves and with students. This increases equity within and across systems. In a standards based system, participation does not influence our understanding of performance against the standards. Instead, it’s reported on separately. This is critical, because it doesn’t cover up potential trouble and blind us to the need for intervention. It also doesn’t punish introverted learners who have mastered standards but who choose not to speak up or contribute.

Wondering what your thoughts may be here as well…..
Angela Stockman recently posted…Create an Installation of Learning Made Visible and Then Invite CompanyMy Profile

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By: John Bennett http://www.brilliant-insane.com/2015/03/hands-fifteen-techniques-ignite-total-participation.html#comment-3038 Sun, 08 Mar 2015 23:39:43 +0000 http://www.brilliant-insane.com/?p=6317#comment-3038 I might suggest another one: Make class participation important to final course grades. And, to counteract (where needed) the possible stress of participation, let the students know that it’s the quality of their questions, answers, comments, or concerns (not simply answers only) that is expected; keeps the discussion moving…
John Bennett recently posted…UDL, Considerations, and Effective LearningMy Profile

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